Make: Getting Started with 3D Printing by Liza Wallach Kloski and Nick Kloski

Raspberry Pi Electronics Projects for the Evil Genius by Donald Norris

Unscrewed: Salvage and Reuse Motors, Gears, Switches, and More from Your Old Electronics by Ed Sobey

The library is chock full of excitement this May.  In addition to preparations for our move to the new building, we are gearing up for the annual summer reading program.  This year’s summer reading slogan is “Build A Better World” highlighting design, construction, and other STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) activities—a great match with the opening of the new facility.  All ages are welcome to participate in the reading program or events or both.  Stay tuned to the library’s website http://joplinpubliclibrary.org/ and Facebook page for details about summer reading and the move.

Summer reading fervor has prompted me to explore STEAM books at the library.  Here are a trio of teen and adult non-fiction titles written for novice-to-intermediate tinkerers interested in technology.  All of these books are informative, helpful, and designed to support project-based creative endeavors.

Make: Getting Started with 3D Printing by Liza Wallach Kloski and Nick Kloski comes from Maker Media, the publisher of Make: magazine and creator of the Maker Faire events showcasing innovations in the maker movement.  The publisher defines the maker movement as a grassroots, “tech influenced DIY community” of “hobbyists, enthusiasts or students” creating, innovating, and “producing value in the community”.  In general, makers are people who engage in hands-on learning through tinkering.  Their creative explorations may lead to innovations or new understanding of the world around them and may involve new technologies or low-tech tools and equipment.  This particular book focuses on 3D printing, the process of building a three-dimensional object by a machine adding layers of material from the object’s bottom to its top.  Getting Started offers a nice introduction to the 3D printing process.  It is less an in-depth history or background of 3D printing than it is an overview with specific tips for project development.  The authors discuss basic “hows” and “whys” of the process then move on to examine different printers and filament.  There are helpful chapters describing the process of choosing an object to print, creating a virtual model of it, and preparing the model for printing.  Additional chapters outline working with specific modeling software—some big names are mentioned, but the offerings are narrowed to a few.  Full-color illustrations throughout are an asset.

For something a bit different, the Raspberry Pi is an accessible entry to computer coding and electronics.  About the size of a library card, the Pi is a fully-functioning computer (albeit with a smaller memory than a laptop) complete with ports for accessories and portable file storage.  Some models have Wi-Fi capability.  Raspberry Pi Electronics Projects for the Evil Genius by Donald Norris presents ideas for activities starting at the intermediate level.  Although there is a brief introduction to the technology, the book is written for those with some background knowledge or experience in computers or electronics.  Project directions and discussion are clear, concise, and direct.  Like the writing style, the black-and-white illustrations are serviceable and relevant.  Snippets of computer code are included where needed.  The author offers two approaches to exploring the Raspberry Pi—discovering a concept or component related to the Pi and implementing a project designed around it (adding a touchscreen and creating a demo of the screen) and building a specific project (create a nighttime monitor for your garden).

My favorite book in this trio is Unscrewed: Salvage and Reuse Motors, Gears, Switches, and More from Your Old Electronics by Ed Sobey.  Tinkering is a key component of the maker movement, and Unscrewed is the road map to tinkering for the uninitiated.  The book’s premise is that inoperative or unwanted gadgets are a treasure trove of hands-on learning.  The author presents basic instructions for dismantling 53 items ranging from a hair dryer to a VCR to an electric toothbrush to a bar code scanner.  Each chapter includes a list of the tools required for the job and a “Treasure Cache” detailing the particularly useful pieces of the gadget.  In “What Now?” the author suggests uses for parts of each device.  Useful safety tips and black-and-white illustrations are used throughout.

Whether you are new to the maker movement or are an expert in the world of STEAM, the library has titles for you.  Join us this summer for loads of fun and a wealth of information!