Archives for posts with tag: Children’s Books

One of the great pleasures of my job is unpacking the new materials that arrive daily at the library. Books, DVDs, CDs – you name it, I get my hands on it fresh out of the box. Because I’m fortunate enough to receive this first look, I come across treasures that otherwise might not appear on my reading radar.

One such treasure is “Fanny in France,” a children’s book – juvenile fiction, to be precise – written by the esteemed chef and restaurateur, Alice Waters, with Bob Carrau. This delightful work is comprised of a series of vignettes about the food, friends and fun that Waters’ daughter experienced in France as a child.

Whether she’s describing a daylong effort making bouillabaisse at a Marseille vineyard, an impromptu picnic when becoming stranded while harvesting wild oysters, or making delicious cheese from the freshest of sheep’s milk, Fanny’s adventures and narrative voice enchant the reader with her honesty and sense of wonder.

Join her in the excitement of Bastille Day in Paris, eat sea urchin pulled from the ocean moments before, and get lost in a bustling outdoor market in Nice. Meet characters like Monsieur Poilane, a traditional baker who offers Fanny a “kid-size bubbling apple tart” straight from the huge brick oven in his basement, or Alice Waters’ artist friend Martine, who scours flea markets for special dinner party accoutrements and feeds a crowd of nine with one roast chicken.

Pick up valuable culinary tips. Learn to select fish by looking at the eyes; “if the fish’s eyes are shiny and clear and they look right back” at you, it’s good to eat. Cook like a chef by putting together a mirepoix, “a special mixture of carefully chopped vegetables and herbs that French people use to start lots of things they cook.” When making pizza dough, handle it tenderly, only stretching it as far as it wants to go; “let the dough guide you,” Fanny instructs.

In addition to anecdotes, “Fanny in France” contains recipes for the dishes mentioned throughout the book. Looking for light meal ideas? You might try the Watercress or Garlic Soup, or even a Salade Nicoise, an omelet or a Croque-Monsieur, also known as a grilled cheese sandwich. Want to wow dinner guests? Consider the Couscous Royal with Chermoula, a spicy North African herb sauce, or the Roasted Herbed Rack of Lamb. Craving something sweet? Throw together an Almond Brown Butter Cake or Chocolate Souffle for a decadent treat.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the glorious, adorable artwork by Ann Arnold. Its colorful detail adds a wealth of richness to “Fanny in France.”

Finally, lest you think you’d need a few years of high school French to read this book, never fear. There is a glossary in the final pages of “Fanny in France,” and the author does a great job of casually translating as she goes along. Nevertheless, I found to my delight that I’d retained enough of my six years of French to understand everything.

You can find “Fanny in France” in the Children’s Department of the Joplin Public Library.  I hope you relish it as much as I did. Happy travels, and bon appetit!

 

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flyingThis anthology of short stories is edited by Ellen Oh, author and President of the We Need Diverse Books (WNDB) movement.  Oh has gathered an impressive group of authors who each present a vivid and memorable voice.  Each story allows the reader to immerse herself in a different cultural experience.  A true representation of the melting pot that is the United States of America, readers may see themselves in these stories, or have the opportunity to peek into the lives of individuals who may be vastly different than their own.

 

From Kwame Alexander’s “mostly true” memoir of a young man in an Honor’s English class, to Soman Chainani’s bittersweet tale of a young boy’s journey of enlightenment, to the childhood grief of losing a parent projected so perfectly in Kelly Baptist’s chronicles, this book is full of tales that are sure to captive a wide, and hopefully diverse, audience.  The star-studded list of authors are impressive in their own right and Oh ensures their work continues to be read with the inclusion of an “About the Authors,” appendage.  The quality you’ll find inside these pages is inspiring.

 

However different the scenery in each story, some common themes emerge.  The varied experiences of children leave their mark, no matter in which culture they happen.  At the end of each story, I found myself wanting to know what happens next, always a sign of an excellent reading experience.

girlReviewed by Tammie Benham

Xan the Witch doesn’t understand why the population of The Protectorate leave a baby all alone in the forest each year.  Still, she travels to the other side of the forest to rescue each baby, finding them homes in other towns with loving families.  Yes she wonders, “What kind of people would leave a baby to fend for itself in a dangerous forest?”

The people of The Protectorate understand that for hundreds of years the baby born closest to the Day of Sacrifice must be left in the woods so that the witch who lives on the other side of the forest won’t attack and destroy them all.  Each year the (all male) members of The Council take the chosen baby from his family and form a procession that ends deep in the forest under a sycamore grove, where they leave the child.

One year, the mother of a young girl baby refuses to quietly give up her daughter. She screams and fights The Council members until they call in The Sisters, a group of all-women who live together in a tower fortress, grow things, cook, and train to be assassins. The Sisters lock up the woman in the top of their tower and feed on her sorrow as she slowly goes insane.  “Magic and madness are linked after all.”

Xan the Witch rescues the madwoman’s daughter of course, as she has all the other children.  However, this time she falls deeply in love with the dark headed girl and decides she will raise her with the help of Glerk the Swamp Monster, who was there at the beginning of time, and Fyrian, the Perfectly Tiny Dragon.

Xan runs out of goat’s milk to feed the baby on her journey back across the forest to her home which necessitates the baby being fed starlight and moonbeams.  When Xan accidentally feeds the baby too many beams from the full moon the baby becomes enmagicked and gains her name, Luna.

Xan quickly discovers that raising a baby with too much magic inside and no ability to control the magic is impossible.  And so, she gathers all the magic inside the girl and locks it up until Luna’s thirteenth birthday.  With each passing year Xan becomes weaker, finally understanding that Luna is unknowingly siphoning off her magic and when Luna’s own magic is released, the five hundred year old Xan will die.

Meanwhile, Antain, a young boy who witnessed Luna being stripped from her mother and the imprisonment of the madwoman, has been trying to come to grips with what he saw.  In the course of his angst, he discovers that things are not at all what they seem with The Sisters, the Council, and with the witch.  Will Luna and her mother ever be reunited?  Will Antain be able to stop the baby sacrifices before his own son is left in the woods?  Will Xan have to give her life when Luna’s magic is released?

This second novel from award-winning writer, Kelly Barnhill has many twists and turns.  The prose is repetitive in spots, dragging out the story.  The overall tone of the book is dark with very few light spots.  This book might be an appealing read to those who loved the last three Harry Potter books.

 

el chapoAuthor/Illustrator Cece Bell has penned a delightful semi-autobiographical graphic novel about her experiences growing up with hearing loss.  After losing her hearing as a result of a childhood illness, Cece has to learn to adjust to living in a non-hearing world.

Cece soon learns about having ear molds made and ends up with wires coming out of her ears!  Being able to hear again only mildly makes up for how different she looks compared to other children her age.  She worries about going to school and the reaction of her classmates, not realizing she will have more indignity to come in the form of the enormous, “Phonic Ear,” which must be worn under her clothes.

Having the Phonic Ear does help Cece hear everything in school which in turn helps her concentrate and improves her grades.  Suddenly school is easy for Cece.  She also learns the Phonic Ear is powerful enough to hear the bathroom habits of her teachers!

As Cece progresses through grade school, she learns to be choosy in making friends and also that her hearing loss doesn’t need to dictate her friendships.  She finds a best friend in a neighbor who treats her like she’s “normal,” meaning her friend refrains from stereotypical behaviors including speaking loudly, slowly, or using exaggerated sign language, despite knowing about Cece’s hearing aids.

When a very cute boy named Mike moves in next door, Cece is awe-struck.  Her reaction is very typically portrayed for a young girl her age, helping the reader understand she truly is just another child who happens to have lost her hearing.

One day, Cece decides to trust Mike with the knowledge she can hear their teacher everywhere she is in the building.  Mike is fascinated with the power of the Sonic Ear and decides to put the device to good use.  When the teacher leaves the room, Cece listens for the class while they engage in all the things children do when the teacher is out of the room, without and of the consequences.  Cece is suddenly the class hero.

The author’s notes provide insight into the world of non-hearing individuals and communicate some of the differences among individuals with hearing loss.  This book handles the subject matter in a fresh way, making for an enjoyable reading experience.

Advertisements searching for those who wish to become Witch-fighting Princesses and Dragon-slaying Knights at Pennyroyal Academy have been spread far and wide. The war with Witches and Dragons has so consumed the current royal-blood population that Pennyroyal is now willing to accept anyone, even those born “common.”

For a young girl who does not remember her own name, the journey to Pennyroyal is not an easy one.  After fighting her way through an enchanted forest where the trees try to kill her (especially the Beech trees), she finds herself in a witches cottage.  When the witch returns with the handsome Remington in tow, the girl discovers the courage to rescue the boy and herself from being made into candy.

Once safe, she and Remington discover they are headed in the same direction, Pennyroyal Academy.  Remington is the object of much attention from the other Pennyroyal Princess candidates, whereas the girl attracts an entirely different kind of attention, possibly because she is clad only in spiderwebs.

The girl enlists at Pennyroyal but is promptly shunted to the infirmary for a course of medicine designed to restore memories of her name and the name of her mother.  However, she insists she is not under a spell.  She has reasons for not wanting to share her history, such as being raised by Dragons.  Until she can recall her true name, the girl is dubbed, “Cadet Eleven,” by the staff of Pennyroyal, which her newly found friends quickly change to Evie.

The Fairy Drillsergeant in charge of Evie’s training is tough, though tiny.  She warns the girls in her charge there is very little chance they will make it through their training to attempt the culminating Helpless Maiden challenge, the only way to gain an invitation back for Year Two of the Academy.

Complicating matters is Malora, another Princess Cadet who does not seem to have any of the virtues of a true Pennyroyal Princess: Courage, Kindness, Compassion, and Discipline.  Her animosity toward Evie escalates as the story and the relationship between Evie and Remington progresses.

This middle-grade story is an enchanting mix of fairytales reimagined and message that love is the only thing that can truly conquer evil.  The story is thankfully not telegraphed and there are quite a few twists and plot turns along the way, keeping things lively.

If you like fairytales and magic, add Mark Twain Award nominee, “Pennyroyal Academy,” to your summer reading list.

Alcatraz Island may seem a peculiar setting for Juvenile Fiction but in the hands of author Gennifer Choldenko, the infamous island becomes a fascinating backdrop in which to come of age.

As Mr. Flanagan begins his job as Associate Warden, his son Moose is struggling with his role in keeping his father safe. Complicating matters is Natalie, Moose’s 16 year old sister, who, “views the world through her own personal kaleidoscope.”  Although Moose and Natalie’s Mom insists Natalie try to blend in, Moose is more accepting and willing to allow Natalie to explore her own limitations.

When a fire breaks out in the Flanagan apartment, Natalie is blamed. However, Moose isn’t so sure Natalie set the blaze. As Moose and his friends investigate what might have happened and decide to ask the Cons imprisoned on Alcatraz, the reader is treated to how notes may have been passed in Alcatraz via cockroach messenger and the backstory of how some prisoners received their nicknames.

Things heat up when a butcher knife goes missing from the kitchen, worrying Moose more. He suspects his Dad is the next target in a Points game targeting prison employees. Al Capone may be the only one who can provide inside information to stop an attack, but will he talk and how will he choose to communicate?

Throughout the book, the personal growth of Moose becomes a secondary story line as he learns who can be trusted, that not everyone who acts nice is trustworthy, and that he is not responsible for the actions of everyone in his world.  “One time is gone, and the other has not yet begun,” for Moose.

The author’s notes on her experience at Alcatraz Island and research for the book may be as compelling as the book itself. The notes provide a glimpse into the thought processes and work that accompany good writing and also provide interesting factoids about “America’s Roughest Prison,” a place that has long captured the imagination of the public.

This Mark Twain Award Nominee book will be voted on during the Missouri Association of School Libraries conference late April, 2016.  Good luck Al Capone!

Before having a little one of my own, I did not know a lot about board books, nor did I spend a lot of time reading or looking through them.  Yes, I ordered them for the library and I would, almost on a daily basis, recommend them to new parents.  And I would explain to said new parents that this type of book was durable, easy to wipe off and thanks to its size, good for small hands to manipulate, but I did not put a lot of thought into what was actually happening story-wise, or illustration-wise inside the books.  However, after many hours of reading board books with my little one I have discovered that not all board books are created equally.  Some are heads above the competition and tops on my current favorites list is the Bizzy Bear series from Nosy Crow publishing.

Currently, there are four Bizzy Bear titles available, Let’s Go and Play!, Let’s Get to Work!, Fun on the Farm and Off We Go!  The library owns multiple copies of each of them, so I have been fortunate to read all the titles numerous times.  My little one’s favorite is Bizzy Bear: Off We Go, but they are all wonderfully creative.  In Off We Go, Bizzy Bear employees various modes of transportation and on the final page ends up relaxing aboard a sailboat.

While the story in each book is clever and the illustrations are bright, engaging and depict things that children can relate to their own lives, the best parts of the books are the movable elements—pull out tabs, sliders, and in Off We Go, a fancy, roundabout that features a turnable wheel—and the heavy, duty construction of the pages.  I have no idea how the books are constructed to be so sturdy, but I can attest to the fact that they will stand up to heavy abuse.  Trust me, my little one loves Bizzy Bear—so much so that all I have to do is start reciting Bizzy Bear, with or without the book, and crazy fast crawling to my lap ensues—and is not gentle when “reading” the stories alone.

Fans will be happy to know that there are two more titles that feature Bizzy Bear—Pirate Adventure and Fire Rescue—due out in January of 2013.  You can bet the library will be getting multiple copies of both titles, but due to their popularity, you might want to place a hold on them soon.

I cannot say enough great things about Bizzy Bear—he is akin to a rock star in my house.  Also, please note, that I owe a big thank you to Betsy Bird, fellow librarian and big-time School Library Journal blogger for my introduction to Bizzy Bear.  Her blog, where she offers a full review of one of the Bizzy Bear titles, plus some other board books, can be found at http://blog.schoollibraryjournal.com/afuse8production/2012/04/23/board-books-2012-what-works-what-doesnt/#_.