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dogI’ve always been a big fan of dogs, particularly working dogs and most particularly farm dogs, so I was happy to see Farm Dogs: 93 Guardians, Herders, Terriers and other Canine Working Partners here at the library. As stated in the introduction, the breeds in the book perform one or more of the following tasks: guarding flocks, protecting the farmstead, herding/driving/working livestock, controlling rats and other vermin, pulling carts, or serving as all-around farmhands. So, hunting dogs are not included, though often found on farms. Sled dogs are a specialized group not listed here, nor are any giant breeds as the author feels they are insufficiently agile for regular farm work though there are certainly some very large breeds included. There are some terriers, although many were either not originally working dogs or have been bred to be companions only for a long time and are no longer considered “working” dogs. While many of the dogs contained make good companions, many are best suited to working conditions and will not make good family members if they don’t have a job to do. Border collies, for example, are very popular as pets but generally are not suited to anything approaching a sedentary life. They need something to do most of the time. If not given something to do, they will find something to do, and not necessarily something their human companions will be happy with!

The first chapter gives a short history of the human/dog relationship while the second delves a bit more deeply into the special needs and considerations of working farm dogs including housing and care, levels of sociability, energy levels, fencing and legal issues. The third chapter gets underway with choosing the right dog for you, including picking a trustworthy breeder or adopting a shelter or rescue dog and the particular concerns about rescue dogs that are intended for work. Also of concern are mixed breed dogs, particular those that are mixes of one type or working dog and another. A terrier/livestock guard mix is probably a poor choice for livestock guarding, given the terrier prey drive, for example. On the other hand, a herding breed/herding breed mix might be a fine herder and is sometimes done intentionally by those setting out to create a new breed but it definitely something that all but the most expert should avoid. Sticking to purebred dogs created for the specific task is usually wisest, though many accidental crosses wind up as general-purpose farm dogs on many a farm!

On to the good stuff! Chapter Four begins the task specific groupings and breeds. The first is livestock guardian dogs, like the Anatolian Shepherd or the Kuvasz. As with all the group chapters, the beginning outlines the general appearance, roles, behavior and temperament, and myths and misinformation about the group along with common health concerns and what to look for in a puppy. After you have that under your belt, you move on to the breeds within the group. This particular group contains a fair number of less well-known breeds, mostly not AKC registered and often very rare in the U.S. like the Armenian Gampr and Karakachan.

Chapter Five covers the herders: the more common Australian Cattle Dog, the Corgis and Border Collie as well as the Bergamaso Sheepdog, Louisiana Catahoula Leopard Dog, and Mudi among others.

Chapter Six, Terriers and Earthdogs, includes the Australian Terrier (one of which I owned many years ago—he was a character), Border, Cairn, and all the usual suspects including all three Russells and the more unusual Patterdale and Jagdterrier and the charmingly named Treeing Feist!

Finally, we come to the Traditional and Multipurpose Farm Dogs such as the Airedale Terrier (classed here because of its use as a multipurpose dog rather than a ratter/vermin hunter as are most terriers), the different varieties of Belgian Shepherds, and Giant Schnauzer.  Rarer are the Hovawart, Karelian Bear Dog (listed specifically for its work in bear deterrence as several other specialized breeds are also included) and the absolutely irresistible (to look at—apparently quite a handful) Pumi. If you’ve never seen one, go find a picture. Those ears!

A terrific book for the simple dog fancier and a valuable resource for anyone considering actually adding one of these working dogs to their life. Lots of pictures, lots of information.

 

If you enjoy inspirational fiction titles with a bit of murder and mayhem in them, you will enjoy today’s author. TERRI BLACKSTOCK is an inspirational cross-over author. She began her writing career under two different pseudonyms writing romance. Her books were published by the mainstream press and she frequented The New York Times best-seller list.

A spiritual awakening caused her to shift her writing into suspenseful drama. Although filled with suspense, mystery, the occasional murder and drama, Blackstock never fails to interweave the worldview and faith of her characters. Two books I will highlight today are no exception.

“IF I RUN” and “IF I’M FOUND” are the first two titles of a planned trilogy. The third book, “If I Live,” is set to be published next spring.

This trilogy is really several stories in one. The series as a whole tackles the lives of Casey and Dylan, who each are dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder. Casey’s is from the childhood trauma of discovering the suicide of her father, who she believes was a victim of murder rather than suicide. Dylan, on the other hand, is a veteran who has survived an attack that killed many of his friends. His PTSD causes him to be honorably discharged from military service. Upon arriving home, he discovers his best friend has been a victim of a vicious murder.

The victim was also a good friend of Casey’s. But her DNA, fingerprints and other evidence cover the crime scene, and Casey has disappeared. Dylan is hired by the family and the local police department to find Casey and return her to be charged with her friend’s murder.

If she was innocent, why did she flee? I kept asking myself that question. Casey appears to be the protagonist plagued by making dumb decisions, causing the reader to involuntarily yell at her, “How come you are being so stupid?!” Not once, not twice but over and over again.

Each of the books also contains a story within the story. There is a subplot in “If I Run” of a young teen’s disappearance. In “If I’m Found,” the subplot is about child abuse and the fallout of the accusations. Each subplot is resolved within the book, but Casey’s continued story of being on the run and Dylan’s attempts to find her continue throughout. Hopefully this will be resolved in book three.

Joplin Public Library has the first two books of this trilogy in regular print and audio. We also have the first book in large print. If you enjoy clean, inspirational reading but with a twist of suspense, you will enjoy all of Blackstock’s works.

On a personal note, if you have not yet visited the new Joplin Public Library, it is your loss. We are still a work in progress, and things are changing each day. You will be surprised and delighted at what you find. Come see us!

indexGenerally speaking, I don’t read books that have to do with nature. I’m not a person who’s interested in mountain climbing or caving. So why I picked up THE WHITE ROAD by Sarah Lotz is still a bit of a mystery to me. Maybe something in the description made me think of one of my favorite horror movies, THE DESCENT. Maybe I just wanted to try something different. No matter what the reason, I’m glad I gave this one a chance.

Simon Newman and his friend Thierry run a struggling website. On the hunt for content that will bring in new readers, Thierry discovers the story of Cwm Pot. While exploring a system of caves in Cwm Pot, three men died. Their bodies were unable to be recovered due to the difficulty of the cave. Thierry and Simon decide that Simon will explore the cave to get footage of the dead men.

Simon finds a guide to lead him through the caves, he assumes everything will go well. But Simon and his guide Ed wind up trapped during a flash flood. The guide attacks Simon and dies in the resulting struggle. On his own in unfamiliar territory, Simon must decide whether he will wait for potential rescue or try to find his way out. Unable to stand the thought of being trapped with four dead men, Simon stumbles his way to rescue.

Of course, Simon’s footage goes viral. He and Thierry are on the verge of being rich, which means they need more content for their site. Thierry comes up with the idea of sending Simon to Mt. Everest to capture footage of the dead climbers at the summit. Eager for money, Simon agrees to go.

This half of the book is told from the viewpoints of Simon and a climber named Juliet. Juliet was a climber who was attempting to climb Mt. Everest with her partner Walter. Walter dies during the climb, leaving Juliet alone. She begins to see something along the way. A phantom climber that haunts her day and night. What – or who – is this entity?

Simon climbs ever closer to the summit, befriending his fellow climbers. As they get closer to the summit, he discovers that one of the other climbers, Mark, is actually the son of the lost Juliet. Mark wants to climb only to find his mother’s body. Simon is conflicted. Does he want footage for the site or to respect the journey of his new friend?

At the summit, Simon loses his grasp on reality and removes his glove. Because of the extreme environment, his hand is frozen. The guide who was leading him to the summit rescues Simon, but Mark is lost. Simon loses part of his hand to frostbite. But the footage of the climb skyrockets the website’s popularity. Despite this, Simon sinks into a deep depression and is haunted by the ghost of Ed. Discussing too much more of the plot would spoil the ending, but I will say that Simon goes on a quest to both rid himself of Ed and discover what haunted Juliet on Everest.

 More than anything, Lotz’s writing captures the extremes of the environments she writes about. The crushing depths of the cave and numbing cold of Everest are described so well that reading them was uncomfortable. The description of going through the tight spaces of Cwm Pot made me pretty sure I don’t ever want to go caving. This wasn’t quite the horror story I thought it would be, but if you’re looking for a different take on both scary situations and nature writing, THE WHITE ROAD is worth your while.

Echo

By Pam Muñoz Ryan

Some books are big. A book with many pages may have this stigma attached to it, as could a book that is bound in a particularly large cover. Working in a library, I hear many individuals comment on the “bigness” of a book. “Wow! That’s a huge book!” Recently, a book crossed my path that not only falls under this umbrella of big due to its size and length, but also due to another factor: its impact. The juvenile fiction novel, Echo, by Pam Muñoz Ryan certainly does well to meet this last-mentioned criterion.

 Echo has a form and style that is unique and inviting. The author does well to keep her audience captivated from start to finish. She does this by engaging the reader with a large story arc that is connected by various smaller stories. The book begins with a tale of discovery, as a boy named Otto uncovers a story and a harmonica in a forest. Otto then comes face to face with that story as he becomes lost in the forest, only to encounter a trio of protagonists that mystically appear—three sisters who seem to come directly from the story Otto has just uncovered. From here, the larger story begins to take shape. The significance of mystery and wonder, as well as the overarching theme of music is introduced in Otto’s dialogue with the three sisters. All of this sets the stage for a dramatic shift to occur in the story, a shift that will take place three different times and that will span three different generational time periods and three different geographical locations.

 In essence, Pam Muñoz Ryan tells one larger than life narrative by utilizing the vantage point of three different characters: Friedrich in Germany, Mike in Pennsylvania, and Ivy in California. Throughout these various stories, the main character remains the same: a captivating harmonica that seemingly finds its way into the hands of passionate musicians who are all interconnected in ways that are never fully realized by the individuals. Through her powerful attention to detail, Muñoz Ryan narrates a driven story that addresses many themes that are easy to relate to and that seem to transcend time and circumstance. She deals with political controversy, as Friedrich finds himself in the middle of Hitler’s rise to power. She deals with issues that are surrounded by the loss of loved ones, and the struggle of discovering one’s place in the world as Mike and his little brother Frankie find themselves in an orphanage after the death of their parents and grandmother. She also deals with racism, as Ivy is confronted with its harsh reality during the process of moving to a new community that views cultural heritage differently than she is used to. Throughout it all, however, there stands in the middle of these issues a solution to overcoming adversities: the power of music.

While not every reader will identify themselves as a musician, Muñoz Ryan takes advantage of the seemingly ever present realization that music plays a part, in some way or another, in the lives of most people who inhabit this earth. By using music as a median, she gives her readers something they can relate to as she wrestles with the thematic issues addressed above. Couple this with her ability to spin a story, and this novel has the potential to be a pretty big book that leaves a pretty big impression on its readers.71aK5tVGXsL

index.aspxWorking at the reference desk I often learn about books by readers asking for help – either in locating the desired title or finding the next title in a series. Some titles peak my interest but with so many good books to read I lose track of the title/author.

Such was the case with Jill Eileen Smith’s historical fiction books on women of the Bible. Fortunately, I spotted the latest on the New Fiction shelves reminding me of my interest.

Redeeming Grace: Ruth’s Story is actually the third in the Daughters of the Promised Land series. However, the series is a theme not a continuation so you can read out of order and not feel as though you are missing anything. If you are a stickler for order, the library has the first two in the series “The Crimson Cord: Rehab’s Story” and “The Prophetess: Deborah’s Story”.

Ruth’s story is also the story of Naomi. Naomi lived in Bethlehem with her husband Elimelech, sons Mahlon and Chilion, and their extended family. In 1296 B.C. Bethlehem and Israel were suffering through drought and eventual famine. Elimelech’s brother Boaz had convinced him to keep working the land despite the drought.

But after 2 years he stopped listening to Boaz and gave up hoping and praying for rain. He made the decision to take his sons to Moab and work the fields there. Naomi did not want to leave Bethlehem but would not let them go without her so the whole family made the journey to Dibon. Ruth and her friend Orpah were at the marketplace when the family arrived and were the first to offer a welcome.

Elimelech was able to secure land from the governor and soon prospered in Moab. His crops flourished and he was able to build a home for his family. Naomi remained true to her faith but her husband and sons were seduced by the festivals and lifestyle of the Moabites spending more and more evenings in Dibon. One such evening Elimelech didn’t come home. Naomi found his body in the road; he had been mauled by a bear.

With the death of her husband Naomi tried to convince her sons to return to Bethlehem. However, the beauties Ruth and Orpah had caught the eye of her sons and they declared their intention to stay and marry.

The custom in Moab was for fathers to choose husbands for their daughters. Ruth and Orpah had both lost their fathers in the war with Israel meaning they could make the choice of who they would marry. Ruth’s mother and the governor planned for Ruth to marry his son, Te’oma. She wanted no part of that arrangement and readily accepted Mahlon’s request to marry.

Ruth’s story truly begins when she marries and becomes Naomi’s daughter-in-law.  Ruth’s devotion to her new family and the growth of her faith sustain her through the many trials she faces. Heartache, loss and hardship test both women but Ruth remains hopeful for a better life and a second chance for love.

This dramatization of Ruth’s life is well done and an engrossing read.  Smith’s research on life and customs of the Israelites and Moabites offers readers a glimpse into what life was like during Ruth’s time.

You can enjoy it without ever having read Ruth in the Old Testament. If you have read it, you’ll find that Smith has crafted a novel that captures the lesson of love exemplified by Ruth in the book.

photoarkWow! Hundreds of amazing photographs fill the pages of The Photo Ark: One Man’s Quest to Document the World’s Animals by Joel Sartore from the fine folks at National Geographic. Sartore has spent most of the last decade travelling around the world to zoos, wildlife centers, private homes and wherever animals live under human care to photograph as many species as he can. So far, that’s over 6,000 species, several hundred of which are included here. He is the founder of National Geographic’s Photo Ark which hopes to add photos of every species under human care to its archive. In his introductory essay, Douglas Chadwick (wildlife biologist and journalist) points out that while Earth’s human population nearly doubled from 3.7 billion in 1970 to 7.5 billion now, during that same time, the number of large land animals fell by half. Ninety percent of the living land animals today are humans and their livestock. Fifty-nine percent of all large (over 33 pounds) and sixty percent of herbivores over 220 pounds are officially threatened with extinction. If pollution and other effects of human existence do not change, one-third of all species could be gone by 2100. Aside from the awful statistics and anxieties about extinctions and ecological disaster, it’s a lovely essay about biodiversity and what makes it a good thing, including how beautiful and interesting so many animals of all sorts are.

In his own essay, Sartore explains the genesis of the Photo Ark project. His wife was diagnosed with breast cancer which caused him to take stock of his life and work as well as to try to figure out what he could do for work while staying close to home (as he normally travelled for months at a time to find animals in remote locations to photograph). He decided to do something worthwhile—photographing as many endangered animals as he could—as well as work that would not require such long trips, which made zoos and the like great places to work. He began his photo ark with a naked mole rat at the Lincoln (Nebraska) Children’s Zoo, a mile from his home. His wife has recovered, and his work continues. He plans to photograph all 12,000+ captive species over the next 15 years, making this a 25-year project.

The animals are photographed in front of either black or white paper backgrounds in studio portrait style and the layouts vary, but are carefully thought out. For instance, in Chapter One (Mirrors), one page might be a bird with various shades of blue plumage while the facing page is a similarly colored butterfly, or a praying mantis on one side with an arctic fox on the other, both with their heads cocked or a giant deep-sea roach appearing to face off with a very similarly shaped Southern three-banded armadillo.  Chapter Two (Partners) features either photos of paired/grouped animals (breeding pairs or friends or littermates, mother and cub and whatnot) or opposite pages of “birds and bees” or “owl and pussycat” and so on. Chapter Three (Opposites) focuses on the unlike or antagonistic (snail and cheetah, Siamese fighting fish, a tiny katydid and a huge stick insect, etc.). “Curiosities” are featured in Chapter Four, your echidnas, platypuses, tarsiers, and other unusual animals along with strangely posed animals or pairings. Finally, Chapter Five presents “Stories of Hope.” Animals like the Bali mynah, rescued by a captive breeding program and re-introduced to the wild or our own Kirtland’s warbler, the rarest songbird in North America. A happy accident (a controlled fire that got out of hand) enabled scientists (in cooperation with nature) to reclaim the habitat necessary for their survival. The birds only nest in 10-foot tall or shorter Jack pines and, given those again via fire and plantings, are now making a comeback. Golden Lion tamarins are being bred in captivity and released to the wild in a repopulation effort that appears to be paying off. By the way, their “cousins”, the cotton-top tamarin, are the focus of Springfield’s Dickinson Park Zoo’s Proyecto Titi, a conservation effort to help preserve it, one of the most endangered primates in the wild.

Each photo is captioned with the animal’s species and its level of existential threat according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. So, EX equals extinct, EW is extinct in the wild, CR is critically endangered, EN is endangered, VU stands for vulnerable, NT is near threatened, LC means least concern, DD indicates data deficient, and NE means not evaluated.

There are a few scattered pages of “behind the scenes” looks at some of the photo shoots, capturing some of the methodology used in getting these extraordinary photos. Also distributed throughout are several “heroes” who have dedicated themselves to assorted conservation efforts, including raptor recovery, endangered primates, extinct in the wild pheasants, and others. The book concludes with an index of the animals photographed including the zoo or other center where the animal was photographed along with their web address.

Open to any random page and enjoy and, to cap it off, learn a bit about conservation efforts and why we need them.

 

One of the great pleasures of my job is unpacking the new materials that arrive daily at the library. Books, DVDs, CDs – you name it, I get my hands on it fresh out of the box. Because I’m fortunate enough to receive this first look, I come across treasures that otherwise might not appear on my reading radar.

One such treasure is “Fanny in France,” a children’s book – juvenile fiction, to be precise – written by the esteemed chef and restaurateur, Alice Waters, with Bob Carrau. This delightful work is comprised of a series of vignettes about the food, friends and fun that Waters’ daughter experienced in France as a child.

Whether she’s describing a daylong effort making bouillabaisse at a Marseille vineyard, an impromptu picnic when becoming stranded while harvesting wild oysters, or making delicious cheese from the freshest of sheep’s milk, Fanny’s adventures and narrative voice enchant the reader with her honesty and sense of wonder.

Join her in the excitement of Bastille Day in Paris, eat sea urchin pulled from the ocean moments before, and get lost in a bustling outdoor market in Nice. Meet characters like Monsieur Poilane, a traditional baker who offers Fanny a “kid-size bubbling apple tart” straight from the huge brick oven in his basement, or Alice Waters’ artist friend Martine, who scours flea markets for special dinner party accoutrements and feeds a crowd of nine with one roast chicken.

Pick up valuable culinary tips. Learn to select fish by looking at the eyes; “if the fish’s eyes are shiny and clear and they look right back” at you, it’s good to eat. Cook like a chef by putting together a mirepoix, “a special mixture of carefully chopped vegetables and herbs that French people use to start lots of things they cook.” When making pizza dough, handle it tenderly, only stretching it as far as it wants to go; “let the dough guide you,” Fanny instructs.

In addition to anecdotes, “Fanny in France” contains recipes for the dishes mentioned throughout the book. Looking for light meal ideas? You might try the Watercress or Garlic Soup, or even a Salade Nicoise, an omelet or a Croque-Monsieur, also known as a grilled cheese sandwich. Want to wow dinner guests? Consider the Couscous Royal with Chermoula, a spicy North African herb sauce, or the Roasted Herbed Rack of Lamb. Craving something sweet? Throw together an Almond Brown Butter Cake or Chocolate Souffle for a decadent treat.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the glorious, adorable artwork by Ann Arnold. Its colorful detail adds a wealth of richness to “Fanny in France.”

Finally, lest you think you’d need a few years of high school French to read this book, never fear. There is a glossary in the final pages of “Fanny in France,” and the author does a great job of casually translating as she goes along. Nevertheless, I found to my delight that I’d retained enough of my six years of French to understand everything.

You can find “Fanny in France” in the Children’s Department of the Joplin Public Library.  I hope you relish it as much as I did. Happy travels, and bon appetit!