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One of the things I love about libraries is their propensity for serendipity.  There’s just something marvelous about browsing the shelves and running across an unexpected delight or clicking links in the electronic catalog and falling down a rabbit hole of an interesting tidbits only to climb out and tumble into another one.  That’s exactly what happened when I ran across this week’s titles.

By the time this review appears in the paper, autumn will have truly arrived and the 2016 World Series will have receded behind other headlines.  Even so, the Cubs’ victory remains memorable, and the entire series offered some outstanding baseball.  I was riding the wave of excitement after Game 7 when I started combing the library’s catalog for books about baseball, curses, Cleveland, and Chicago.  Forty-five minutes later I climbed out of the rabbit hole with two widely different reads tied together by happenstance.

First item up to bat is The World Series Curse by David A. Kelly which popped up while looking at books about baseball curses and the Cubs.  Written for children, The World Series Curse is the first in a spinoff series of baseball mysteries featuring major league teams and their stadiums.  Cousins Kate and Mike are baseball fans and accidental, amateur detectives—the perfect mix for sniffing out and solving predicaments at the ballpark.  Here they find themselves in the midst of a potential scandal affecting the outcome of a hotly contested World Series between the Cubs and the Red Sox.  Cubs players have been accused of cheating on the road and at home, including corking a bat.  Kate and Mike happen to know the right people and be in the right place at the right time to solve the mystery and prove the Cubs’ fair play.  Throw in lively illustrations, a bitter sportswriter, and a red herring disguised as a goat, and you have an interesting, light read for elementary-age readers.  Give this one to reluctant readers who enjoy sports stories or to mystery fans seeking a less-than-intense book.

Second in the lineup is a book by one of my favorite authors, Studs Terkel.  A true son of Chicago, Terkel spent the bulk of his life and his career immersed in the city.  Although known for his radio interviews and oral histories, Terkel’s own voice is front-and-center in this title.  Studs Terkel’s Chicago (a no-nonsense name reflecting a no-nonsense author) is a love letter to his hometown.  It’s a loose, almost sloppy love letter though—more stream-of-consciousness conversation or storytelling than formal declaration.  That’s part of its charm.  Terkel travels his own path through the streets of Chicago, linking historical events and figures, personalities from the varied neighborhoods, and vignettes from his youth.  He strings together these gems as he meanders through the physical landscape and his mental path.  Terkel’s voice is all but literally present—if you’ve ever heard an interview with him, you can hear his gravelly voice as you read the book.  In fact, it would be just as good or better as an audiobook; the downside would be the loss of the fantastic black and white photographs depicting life on the streets of Chicago.  Studs Terkel’s Chicago is a fantastic journey through one man’s experience with one of the great cities of the world.  It’s charming and gritty and delightful, but it’s not the easiest read out there.  If you are unfamiliar with Studs Terkel or passingly familiar with his well-known works, this is not the place to get acquainted.  Try one of his books of oral histories first—the library has several.

Both of the books I’ve mentioned happen to be available in electronic book format from the library’s Overdrive service.  You can access hundreds of e-books and electronic audio books at no extra charge with a Joplin Public Library card.  Overdrive is available on home computers or as an app for cell phones, tablets, and other electronic devices.  These electronic titles can be checked out and put on hold just like physical versions although borrowing times may differ.  The titles disappear when they are due, so there aren’t any overdue fines.  The Overdrive app also includes features which help ease eye fatigue while reading on a screen.  If you would like to know more about Overdrive and how to access it, stop by or call the library at (417) 623-7953.  Our staff at the Reference, Children’s, and Teen Departments are happy to answer questions about Overdrive or to help you use this handy resource.  Give it a try!

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