A popular genre at Joplin Public Library continues to be graphic novels – not just for the teens and children, but for the adults. In fact, on a regular basis, the library adds graphic novels to its adult collection. Below are some that I’ve been devouring lately.

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosch

Although this one is more of an episodic memoir with lots of cartoons by the author, I regard it as a graphic novel because the illustrations convey so much of the story. I hadn’t read this prior to its selection by my book club, nor was I familiar with the author’s blog that is the source for most of this book’s material, but I fell for it from the first page. You have to love someone who re-creates a drawing she made when she was 5 years old because she doesn’t really know what else to use as an introduction.

The subtitle of “Hyperbole and a Half” is “unfortunate situations, flawed coping mechanisms, mayhem, and other things that happened.” This lengthy description pretty much sums it up. Brosch lays it all out there, from her quirky behavior as a child (obsessed with sugar, she once crawled through the window of a locked bedroom to gain access to her grandfather’s birthday cake, all of which she ate) to her battle with chronic depression.

Dogs figure prominently in Brosch’s world. When she was a kid, her family decided to adopt a Helper Dog to keep their other one, Simple Dog, company. Unfortunately, Helper Dog turned out to have some issues. This story’s title says it all: “Helper Dog Is an —hole.” As an adult, she acquired her own Simple Dog and Helper Dog. Her tale of moving across the country with them and their difficulty adjusting had me laughing with sympathetic understanding.

And if you’re ever having a bad day, flip to “Dinosaur (The Goose Story),” about a wayward goose that finds its way into Brosch’s yard and house. It’s epic. And lest you think she’s making everything up, she provides screen shots of video she took of the goose.